Volume 47, N. 3

Special Issue: Deformation Characteristics of Geomaterials: Honorary & Special Lectures (Invited Editors: S. Rios, A. Viana da Fonseca, C. Ferreira), in progress, July-September 2024

Micro to macro investigation of clays advising their constitutive modelling - part I

Article

Volume 47, N. 3, Special Issue: Deformation Characteristics of Geomaterials: Honorary & Special Lectures (Invited Editors: S. Rios, A. Viana da Fonseca, C. Ferreira), in progress, July-September 2024 | DOWNLOAD PDF (33 downloads)

Abstract

This keynote lecture discusses the results of a long lasting experimental research, devoted to the investigation of clay microstructure and its evolution upon loading. Micro-scale analyses, involving scanning electron microscopy, image processing, mercury intrusion porosimetry and swelling paths to test the clay bonding, are presented on clays subjected to different loading paths, with the purpose of providing experimental evidence of the processes at the micro-scale which underlie the clay response at the macro-scale. Data from the literature on clays of different classes, either soft or stiff, are compared to original results on two stiff clays, Pappadai and Lucera clay, both in their natural state and after reconstitution in the laboratory. The results presented herein allow building a conceptual model of the evolution of clay microstructure upon different loading paths, providing microstructural insights into the macro-behaviour described by constitutive laws and advising their mathematical formalization in the framework of either continuum mechanics or micro-mechanics. For editorial purposes, the research results are presented in two parts. The first part, presented in this paper, concerns the results for reconstituted clays, whereas a second part, concerning the corresponding natural clays, is discussed in a second companion paper.

Keywords: Microstructure, Constitutive modeling, Soil microstructure analysis,


Submitted on December 05, 2023.
Final Acceptance on January 10, 2024.
Discussion open until November 30, 2024.
DOI: 10.28927/SR.2024.011723